Country Code
FR

First cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in France: Surveillance, investigations and control measures, January 2020

A novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV-2) causing a cluster of respiratory infections (coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19) in Wuhan, China, was identified on 7 January 2020. The epidemic quickly disseminated from Wuhan and as at 12 February 2020, 45,179 cases have been confirmed in 25 countries, including 1,116 deaths. Strengthened surveillance was implemented in France on 10 January 2020 in order to identify imported cases early and prevent secondary transmission. Three categories of risk exposure and follow-up procedure were defined for contacts.

Preliminary case report on the SARS-CoV-2 cluster in the UK, France, and Spain

Almost half of the confirmed COVID-19 cases detected so far in the United Kingdom are part of a large cluster of 13 British nationals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in the UK, Spain, and France. Transmissions among this cluster occurred at a ski resort in France, and originated from a single infected traveller returning from a conference in Singapore where he acquired the virus. At least 21 individuals were exposed to the virus, tested, and quarantined, with 13 of those testing positive between the period of 6th February and 15th February.

Clinical and virological data of the first cases of COVID-19 in Europe: a case series

BACKGROUND: On Dec 31, 2019, China reported a cluster of cases of pneumonia in people at Wuhan, Hubei Province. The responsible pathogen is a novel coronavirus, named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We report the relevant features of the first cases in Europe of confirmed infection, named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), with the first patient diagnosed with the disease on Jan 24, 2020.

First cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the WHO European Region, 24 January to 21 February 2020

In the WHO European Region, COVID-19 surveillance was implemented 27 January 2020. We detail the first European cases. As at 21 February, nine European countries reported 47 cases. Among 38 cases studied, 21 were linked to two clusters in Germany and France, 14 were infected in China. Median case age was 42?years; 25 were male. Late detection of the clusters' index cases delayed isolation of further local cases. As at 5 March, there were 4,250 cases.

The MIPEX Health strand: a longitudinal, mixedmethods survey of policies on migrant health in 38 countries

Abstract 
 
Background Within health systems, equity between migrants and native-born citizens is still a long way from being achieved. Benchmarking the equitability of policies on migrant health is essential for monitoring progress and identifying positive and negative aspects of national policies. For this purpose, the 2015 round of the Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX) was expanded to include a strand on health, in a collaborative project carried out between 2013 and 2017 in 38 countries. 
 

Foster and Improve Integration of Trafficked Persons (FIIT) - France

The project aims at addressing specific integration needs of VoTs in the target countries by involving officials as well as NGOs practitioners on devising approaches to ensure the integration of VoTs through a partnership between the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and five EU Member States: France, Belgium, United Kingdom, Italy and Hungary. These countries were chosen as they encompass a wide spectrum of situation making them representative of all situations present in the EU.

Migration health: Better health for all in Europe

The Assisting Migrants and Communities (AMAC): Analysis of Social Determinants of Health and Health Inequalities has been an initiative of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), implemented with the support of the European Commission’s Health Programme and the Office of the Portuguese High Commissioner for Health, which has contributed to recent efforts to tackle health inequalities in relation to migration in Europe.
 

Maternal and child healthcare for immigrant populations

Migration represents a great opportunity for the European Union. It counteracts the demographic ageing and enhances Europe’s economic potential by meeting the needs of an increasingly demanding labour market and by contributing to socio-cultural enrichment. A holistic and sensitive policy framework needs to be developed in order to provide quality health care to migrant mothers and their children.

Cultural Competence and Training in Mental Health Practice in Europe: Strategies to Implement Competence and Empower Practitioners

The achievement of good mental health levels is important for the economic and social welfare of a society. Due to the circumstances surrounding the migration process, migrant populations have been found to disproportionately face mental health problems when compared to host populations. On the other hand, in today’s EU multicultural societies, mental health care approaches are often ineffective, resulting in major disparities especially affecting migrant populations.

Cultural Competence and Training in Mental Health Practice in Europe: Strategies to Implement Competence and Empower Practitioners

This paper aims to highlight the common denominator of cultural training demands and responses of mental health professionals, regardess of the healthcare system, the Europen country of the migrant community concerned, as well as the basic elements to efficiently implement cultural competency within the mental healthcare setting.