Country Code
AU

Isolation and rapid sharing of the 2019 novel coronavirus (SAR-CoV-2) from the first patient diagnosed with COVID-19 in Australia

Objectives: To describe the first isolation and sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 in Australia and rapid sharing of the isolate. Setting: SARS-CoV-2 was isolated from a 58-year-old man from Wuhan, China who arrived in Melbourne on 19 January 2020 and was admitted to the Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne from the emergency department on 24 January 2020 with fever, cough, and progressive dyspnoea.

Travel health risk perceptions of Chinese international students in Australia - Implications for COVID-19

Background: International students frequently return to their country of origin to visit friends and relatives (VFR), and are at increased risk of travel-associated infections. Little is known of their travel health seeking behaviours. China is the biggest source of international students studying in Australia and the unprecedented epidemic of COVID-19 in China makes this an important area of research. Methods: Focus groups of Chinese international students were conducted to explore travel health-related knowledge, attitudes and practices.

COVID-19, Australia: Epidemiology Report 10 (Reporting week to 23:59 AEST 5 April 2020)

Confirmed cases in Australia notified up to 5 April 2020: Notifications = 5,805; Deaths = 33. Notifications in Australia remain predominantly among people with recent overseas travel, with some locally-acquired cases being detected. Most locally-acquired cases are able to be linked back to a confirmed case, with a small portion unable to be epidemiologically link. The distribution of overseas-acquired cases to locally acquired cases varies by jurisdiction.

COVID-19, Australia: Epidemiology Report 11 (Reporting week to 23:59 AEST 12 April 2020)

Confirmed cases in Australia notified up to 12 April 2020: notifications = 6,394; deaths = 46. The reduction in international travel and domestic movement, social distancing measures and public health action have likely slowed the spread of the disease. Notifications in Australia remain predominantly among people with recent overseas travel, with some locally-acquired cases being detected. Most locally-acquired cases are able to be linked back to a confirmed case, with a small portion unable to be epidemiologically linked.

Addressing female genital mutilation in the Asia Pacific: the neglected sustainable development target

While much work has focused on advocacy and prevention efforts in countries of high prevalence in Africa and diaspora in Europe, there has been a paucity of discussion on FGM in the Asia‐Pacific region. FGM is practised in India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, the Philippines and Indonesia; however, none of these countries are supported by the UNFPA‐UNICEF Joint Programme on the Abandonment of FGM. Australia and New Zealand are also home to migrant women and girls with FGM.