Internal and International Migration and its Impact on the Mental Health of Migrants. In: Moussaoui D., Bhugra D., Tribe R., Ventriglio A. (eds) Mental Health, Mental Illness and Migration

This chapter describes the facts and figures of today’s migration patterns and briefly presents the limits and findings of the existing research on the impact of different forms of migration on the mental health of migrants. The article aims at promoting a rights-based approach to migrants’ access to mental health care, as supported by international legal instruments.

Universal Health Coverage - "Leave No Migrant Behind" (Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian)

Migration is a social determinant of health. Throughout the migration process, migrants are exposed to a unique set of sociocultural, economic and environmental factors that may increase their risk of exposure to negative health outcomes, including communicable and non-communicable diseases. Migrants and mobile populations can face many obstacles in accessing essential health care services due to several factors including irregular immigration status, language barriers, discrimination, a lack of migrant-inclusive health policies and lack of affordable health services.

Migration Health in the Sustainable Development Goals (Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian)

The UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development puts people at the center of all actions, particularly the most marginalized and disempowered, for the realization of societies that are more equitable and inclusive. It also acknowledges that migration carries a development potential, owing to migrants’ intellectual, cultural, human and financial capital, and their active participation in society. Being and staying healthy is a fundamental precondition for migrants to work, be productive, and contribute to the social and economic development of communities of origin and destination.

Migration and health. In: Adepoju A., Fumagalli C., Nyabola N. (eds) Africa Migration Report: Challenging the narrative

The relationship between migration and health is explored, including resilience, vulnerability, and social determinants of health throughout the migration cycle. The chapter maintains that migration health governance should include the control of communicable diseases, health security, universal health coverage (UHC), and migration-responsive systems, which are all critical to health security, public health, and development.

Universal Health Coverage - "Leave No Migrant Behind" (Russian)

Migration is a social determinant of health. Throughout the migration process, migrants are exposed to a unique set of sociocultural, economic and environmental factors that may increase their risk of exposure to negative health outcomes, including communicable and non-communicable diseases. Migrants and mobile populations can face many obstacles in accessing essential health care services due to several factors including irregular immigration status, language barriers, discrimination, a lack of migrant-inclusive health policies and lack of affordable health services.

Migration Health in the Sustainable Development Goals (Russian)

The UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development puts people at the center of all actions, particularly the most marginalized and disempowered, for the realization of societies that are more equitable and inclusive. It also acknowledges that migration carries a development potential, owing to migrants’ intellectual, cultural, human and financial capital, and their active participation in society. Being and staying healthy is a fundamental precondition for migrants to work, be productive, and contribute to the social and economic development of communities of origin and destination.

COVID-19: Exposing and addressing health disparities among ethnic minorities and migrants

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on health disparities and has created an opportunity to address the causes underlying these inequities. Every country has vulnerable populations that require special attention from policymakers in their response to the current pandemic. Inclusive policies that ensure equal access to care for everybody including COVID-19 testing, new therapeutics, and a vaccine (when available) will be critical to protecting the whole population.

IOM working with the Global Fund

The Global Fund provides financial support for life-saving interventions to countries bearing the highest disease burden and lowest economic capacity, where the key and vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria. The Global Fund does not implement directly but instead funds programmes implemented by countries, regional organizations, and partners in over 100 countries with high-level burdens of HIV, TB, and Malaria.